Japan needs lower Jamaica coffee prices

Jamaica Blue Mountain (JBM) coffee dealers are now in Japan (late September) seeking to secure new contracts. Japan is a mature market that buys 85 per cent of the total JBM crop. So any new contract secured would likely mean that another player lost marketshare.

Japan loves JBM but its not exactly selling like rice cakes. So reports are that the inventory of JBM is growing.

As a result Japan buyers wants a lower price for the JBM. And they are likely to get it, as supply now outpaces demand. In other words there’s a lot of beans going around.

Whatever happens in Japan affects the world. So that means that you–the reader on Jamaicamocha will reap cheaper prices on luxury roasted beans. Want even lower prices contact us and we will make it happen.

 

Steven Beans

info@jamaicamocha.com

 

 

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Why is coffee from Blue Mountain, Jamaica so incredibly expensive?

Why is coffee from Blue Mountain, Jamaica so expensive? 

Simple demand, supply and the resultant price. 

People are drawn to the balanced cup that real Jamaica Blue Mountain coffee offers. It’s chocolatey infused with spice and fruit without bitterness. 

Additionally Japan demands it more than the rest of the world and buys 70% of total production. This results in 30% for the rest of world. Additionally the region that it’s grown in–the steep slopes of the Blue Mountains, limits cultivation in an is already limited zone. Its 8 hours of daily mist and fog crestes a natural green-house effect which slow ripens the beans.

Additionally the island offers a bespoke coffee made in traditions delevoped over hundreds of years. But that’s not to say farms aren’t investing in modern and new cultivation methods.

Some critics say that over the last 20years with the rise of Starbucks and specialty coffee, other regions have improved quality and now offer cups with similar quality to Jamaica Blue Mountain.

The truth is great coffee can come from anywhere but not all have same taste profile. In short, two handbags of the same size says nothing about the quality and style. A Louis Vuitton handbag will always maintain its value due to its quality and taste, so too with Jamaica Blue Mountain.

Starbucks confirms Jamaica 

(May 4, 2017) –  Starbucks Coffee Company today announced it entered a geographic licensing agreement with Caribbean Coffee Traders Limited, a consortium led by Margaritaville Caribbean Group, a leading restaurant management and franchise operator in the Caribbean. The agreement grants Caribbean Coffee Traders the exclusive rights to own and operate Starbucks® stores in the country. Jamaica will be Starbucks 17th market in the Latin America and Caribbean region, with the first store slated to open in Montego Bay.

“Jamaica is a country blessed with a rich culture and heritage, particularly with its locally-grown and world renowned Blue Mountain coffee, which Starbucks has sourced as a specialty offering for over 40 years,” said Ricardo Rico, Starbucks general manager and vice president for Latin America operations. “We are delighted to build on this legacy and continue our expansion into the Caribbean by introducing the Starbucks Experience in Jamaica for the first time. As we position the brand for continued growth, we are proud to add Caribbean Coffee Traders to our strong network of licensing partners and leverage their proven market capabilities to reach new customers.”

Starbucks® stores in Jamaica will be operated by Caribbean Coffee Traders Limited, a joint venture between Ian Dear, Chief Executive Officer of Margaritaville Caribbean Group and Adam Stewart, who is also Deputy Chairman and Chief Executive Officer of Sandals Resorts International. Margaritaville Caribbean Group currently operates restaurant, entertainment and tour concepts throughout the Caribbean, and provides complete, multi-branded food and beverage experiences for major Caribbean tourism hubs. Margaritaville Caribbean Group’s brand portfolio includes a diverse collection of proprietary brands, international franchises, casual dining concepts, themed bars and popular quick service restaurants, including Wendy’s, Dominos, Dairy Queen, Quiznos, Auntie Annie’s, Cinnabon, Moe’s Southwest Grill and Nathan’s. The group employs over 1,000 people throughout the region.

“We are thrilled to welcome Starbucks, a globally recognized brand, to Jamaica. Leveraging our knowledge of the local market, we will deliver upon the Starbucks Experience and create a global platform for Jamaica’s locally-grown and Blue Mountain© coffee.” said Ian Dear, Chief Executive Officer of Margaritaville Caribbean Group. “Our organizations share similar values, including our dedication to the customer experience, commitment to our crew members, and responsible corporate citizenship.”

For more than 45 years, Starbucks has built its brand by delivering a consistent, authentic in-store experience to customers around the globe that is rooted in high-quality arabica coffee and engaged, knowledgeable baristas. Since launching the brand in Latin America, Starbucks has grown to over 1,000 stores across 16 markets, 15 of which are operated by trusted licensing partners. In the Caribbean, Starbucks licensees currently operate 43 stores across Aruba, the Bahamas, Curacao, Puerto Rico, and most recently, Trinidad and Tobago. Jamaica will become the company’s sixth market in the Caribbean region. 


Avoid bad Jamaica coffee 

Avoid bad Jamaican coffee by knowing what’s the best Jamaican coffee. 

Here’s a ranking list of the best Jamaican coffees.  

The bad coffees normally can come from overseas based mixed coffee which purports to be 100% authentic Jamaica Blue Mountain(JBM). Local brands that suck tended to come from one established brand. 

That brand occasionally put out questionable coffee on the local market. Good news however is that the brand was recently acquired. That resulted in the crosschecking of batches to ensure quality standards are maintained.

On another matter, buyers should never buy locally packaged coffee with unknown names. Things which seem too good to be true–usually disappoint.

 JBM usually sells for $25 per 8oz plus shipping. So JBM at $10-15 per 8oz is very fake. No one would buy a new BMW for $9,000, no one would trust it. Yet people risk their senses and health by purchasing cheap bulk coffee.

 If you are the one making the coffee open your senses. The aroma, fatness and evenness of the beans should be without reproach.  

The taste should be balanced with complex levels of flavour and no bitterness. 

Avoid bad coffee by knowing great coffees and sticking to them. Test brands you are not familiar with in small quantities and compare to established brands you know.

At Jamaicamocha we test all the coffee we sell and provide a fair no nonsense rank to inform your purchase consideration.


Jamaica coffee at Starbucks 2017

Jamaica Blue Mountain coffee supplier Amber Estate will resume selling roasted beans in April. Until then it supplies green beans to Starbucks.
In its place, the makers of Amber, Gold Cup Coffee will supply Gold Cup Supreme peaberries. It’s a lovely chocolate with lemon delight. Pure beauty for the lips enjoyed best as a pour over or French press.

  • Producer: Gold Cup
  • Elevation: 2000-5000 feet 
  • Processing Method: Washed
  • Tasting Notes:  Balanced with chocolate and citrus
  • Beans: peaberries 
  • Body: Medium
  • Acidity: Medium
  • Pairing Flavors: Nuts, citrus, baking spices

Buy Jamaica coffee during shortage like salada

A local coffee brand SALADA Foods Jamaica Limited found out the hard way where to buy lots of Jamaica coffee during a nationwide coffee shortage.The problem was that they bought too much coffee at high prices equivalent to half of its annual sales.Prices have now stabilised and some dealers actually think it will dip in a year

The company said on Friday that its huge J$400 millon (us$3m) build up of inventory a year ago still stands at $309 million as at March 2016.The company complained about coffee prices last year but bought lots of it regardless. The company underwent a change of management in recent years.salada made J$15.5 m net proft on $159 m in revenues or 45 per cent lower profit year on year.

The price increases arguably slashed its sales by one-quarter, year on year.Coffee farmers are demanding more per box due to the impact of currency depreciation on farm costs, and also the cost to protect the coffee against disease and theft. Three years ago processors paid roughly $3,000 for a box of coffee cherry to farmers. Now farmers get $11,000 a box.Salada faced with increased local coffee competition in both the instant and brewed markets will launch new instant coffee products this year.