Black Rifle Coffee apparently banned in Assault Weapon Prohibition in Canada

Canada‘s Prime Minister, Justin Trudeau, appears to have accidentally banned Black Rifle Coffee in a new order that prohibits 1,500 semi-automatic guns. “Say it ain’t so …

Source: Justin Trudeau May Have Accidentally Banned Black Rifle Coffee In Assault Weapon Prohibition

Dealers want January for Jamaica Coffee Festival

img_20190302_144410_1-1017301785.jpgSome dealers want the Jamaica Coffee Festival 2021 changed from March to January to align with the Jamaica Blue Mountain Coffee Day.

“The coffee dealers want January and that makes sense for us,”said a source who wouldn’t give their name due to the sensitive stage of negotiations. “Coffee dealers are considering pulling out and doing our own thing next January.

It sounds like a no brainer to align a local festival with a Day that’s promoted in Japan and Jamaica for coffee. The coffee festival is however produced by an arm of the Ministry of Tourism and their mandate is to drive visitors to the island during slow periods like March.

The Coffee Festival produced by the Ministry in its third consecutive year but there were previous intermittent staging in the past.

Since the 1960s, Japan was the main buyer and marketer of Jamaica Blue Mountain coffee. The January date signifies the first real shipment to the Asian country. The inaugural  Jamaica Blue Mountain (JBM) Coffee Day was celebrated in 2019.

There is also International Coffee Day held in October. That occasion is used to promote and celebrate coffee as a beverage, with events occurring globally. The first official date was 1 October 2015, as agreed by the International Coffee Organisation and was launched in Milan.

It cost a firm US$25 m to learn the difference between brewed coffee and instant coffee

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Brewed coffee and soluble coffee are not the same and a US brand found that out the costly way.

In late December 2019, it resulted in the makers of the Grove Square Coffee branded products setting aside up to US$25 million effectively to provide consumer refunds, according to a release on the matter from law firms Burke Harvey LLC and Ward & Cooper LLC.

The company labeled three roasted products as ready for use in the popular Keurig brewing machines. It however didn’t state explicitly that the pods were filled with instant or soluble coffee. Instead placing beans on the package which lawyers argued provided the impression that the coffee was in a bean or grounded state.

Instant coffee dissolves when water is added which contrasts with brewing of beans which requires a filter to separate the liquid from the ground coffee beans. In the factory, although the process to create instant involves more manufacturing steps it generally sells for less than whole beans. That’s because the process of creating instant coffee usually starts with imperfect cheaper beans.

Keurig cups or Kcups come in many different coffee origins including low price point to luxury Jamaica Blue Mountain.

“Defendants have agreed to create a $25 million settlement fund, which, after deducting attorneys’ fees, costs and expenses, administrative expenses, and service awards, will be used to pay Class Members who submit valid Claim Forms,” stated a release on the matter.

Class action members will receive a set amount per claim form. Consumers who purchased in Alabama will receive up to $100 per claim; New York up to $275 per claim; and US$25 for California, Illinois, New Jersey, North Carolina, South Carolina, and Tennessee.

 

Luckin Coffee stores overtake Starbucks in China and stock jumps to all time high

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photo: EqualOcean

Luckin Coffee (NASDAQ: LK), traded at all time highs on Monday as the stock continues to steam ahead in tandem with the growth of its store count now surpassing Starbucks in China.

Luckin is now the largest coffee chain in China: As context, Luckin took two years from its inception to overtake the 41,00  store count of Starbucks (NASDAQ: SBUX) which took two-decades to build out. The store count for both companies are changing literally by the day

The stock hit US$36 on December 23, up from a low of US$13 in May, just a few days after its IPO. Analysts expect the company to earn US$2.1 billion in annual revenues by 2020 up from some US$743 million. Fuelling this growth are new store sales. Luckin Coffee formed in 2017 and listed this year, now operates 4,280 according to its website. This growth represents a more than 200 per cent rise year on year, at the time of this report.

Luckin’s prices its coffee noticeably lower than Starbucks. That results in Starbucks by default being set to serve wealthier customers. Starbucks lattes cost roughly US$4.30 a cup whereas “Luckin is way more affordable at $1.50,” according to a source in China.

Lets see how Luckin continues to grow the coffee culture in the traditionally tea drinking country.

Can Blockchain improve Jamaica coffee, after all Starbucks wants to use it.

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Fake luxury coffee hurts everyone in the supply chain. So knowing whether your beans are actually from a farm in the hills of Jamaica Blue Mountains is meaningful. Nowadays avoiding fakes requires buying brands you trust. And overtime one gets familiar with the origin taste profiles.  But that’s knowledge built from experience. What about someone buying Jamaica coffee for the first time and concerned about getting ripped off with fake JBM costing upwards of US$50 per pound.

One solution is to buy through curated platforms like Etsy or brokers like us which micro tests batches monthly to ensure customers get quality.

Soon there will be another way.

Last year Starbucks announced plans to use Blockchain with the aim of allowing consumers to in real time trace the origin of the bean. Ultimately as a method of  improving pricing throughout the supply chain. This method however more work but the outcome will definitely be replicated throughout the luxury coffee market.

Blockchain creates an immutable ledger of all transactions sort of like an email thread. You can quickly go back to the origin of a concept by searching the tread.  Blockchain is increasingly being implemented in many back-office processes at industries from traditional banking and insurance, extending its application to even food production and pharmaceutical industries. Walmart in 2018, along with the support of International Business Machines Corporation (IBM), reportedly adopted a programme that uses blockchain to digitize the food supply chain process with its pork suppliers. Consequently it takes roughly 2 seconds to trace the origin of food which aims to reduce chance of infected food entering the supply chain to customers.

In December 2019, the global blockchain technologies market was valued at about $2.01 billion in 2018, and is expected to grow to $9.97 billion at a rapid annual growth rate of more than 49% through 2022. Companies across various industries are increasingly investing in block chain technology due to its high efficiency in data management.

Blockchain technology is growing strongly in major sectors such as healthcare, banking and finance, digital assets, and also in several government departments. Thus, companies such as VISA, Facebook, Microsoft and Amazon are investing in the technology to integrate blockchain with their daily operations at an early stage.

 

The difference between Jablum, Island Blue and Wallenford

 

 

These three brands sell Jamaica Blue Mountain (JBM) coffee but over the years their stories were somewhat intertwined.

Things to know historically.

Jablum is the most known brand globally of JBM.

Wallenford is the oldest brand and was formerly the regulator of all JBM until Government split its regulatory from marketing functions in about the late 90s.

Island Blue is the newest but owns the largest non-blue mountain coffee lands.

Things to know about current ownership:

Wallenford was acquired by Canadian billionaire Michael Lee-Chin in 2013 and then in 2016 he also acquired Jablum.

IslandBlue was formerly called ‘Wallenford Blue’ but ceased paying royalties for the use of the name when Wallenford was acquired by Lee-Chin. Island Blue is owned by Jamaica Standard Products (JSP) which buys Jamaica Blue Mountain beans and brands it as Island Blue. JSP also separately operates the largest Jamaica High Mountain factory in the island. High Mountain coffee is farmed outside the Jamaica Blue Mountain region. Its High Mountain products are not branded as Island Blue.

Things to know about taste profile.

Wallenford and Jablum are both large JBM producers and now owned by a common company. Both brands share space and facilities now. It is not immediately clear whether all buying and roasting operations are amalgamated.  A general tip however is that Wallenford offers a chocolatey nutty and lemon almost wine taste profile while Jablum is light cocoa and at times hazelnut to vanilla.

Island Blue is more chocolatey with spice tones.

What does Jamaica Blue Mountain Coffee taste like

Tones of chocolate, nut and spice without bitterness. That’s the classic taste profile of Jamaica Blue Mountain (JBM).  In other words three distinct layers of tastes. The profile can vacillate slightly with more curated brands offering a transition between chocolate, spice and fruit. 

The complexity and smoothness gained a reputation since the 1960s as a coffee that stood world’s apart from your typical cup. Context is important. The 60s was an era before Starbucks, when instant coffee was largely prevalent. Additionally, the average coffee drinker opened a can of dark roasted ground beans. The industry at the time was set on delivering the cheapest cup. That often meant dark very bitter brew. Besides if people had an issue they just added sugar and milk.

Within this era of mass bitter coffee was a beverage from Jamaica that could be consumed black! A brew that allowed the subtle layers of tones to cover the palette of its drinker. No doubt this resulted in it being a delicacy which fetched a premium price.

Then came Starbuck cafes. Its entry largely killed the canned bitter coffee market and resulted in shifting the value chain from cheap to tasty beans. It resulted in the world adopting farming, harvesting, producing and brewing practices that were standard in places like Jamaica and other high end quality coffee nations. The result commodity beans are more flavourful.

Nowadays it is commonplace to source beans from around the world with satisfying taste profiles. But most cannot get the Jamaica Blue Mountain balance of chocolate, spice and fruit. Usually commodity coffees are nutty. Or spicy. Or fruity. It is very rare that they get contrasting tones in one like a quality JBM.

So what does Jamaica Blue Mountain Coffee taste like: It tastes like quality.