Why Jablum Gold made with Jamaica peaberry coffee beans are rare

Jablum Gold is made of beans from the Jamaica Blue Mountains. These beans are not only handpicked on the farms, they are also curated in the factories to get the fattest beans and best taste. So no boudbr it’s made in low quantities.

Add peaberries which are made from 1 in every 10 beans on average, then add the duration process and you get an exceedingly rare Jablum Gold peaberries.

This coffee plays its part offering theatre from unpacking the beans, inspecting its pea like nature, smelling, then cupping.

Essentially it makes a great cup for the holidays. The tones are traditional chocolate and spice, but the peaberries give it a crisp tealike fruitiness and smoothness.

https://www.etsy.com/listing/515150216/jamaica-blue-mountain-coffee-8-oz-x-1

Cookie coffee cup

So what are people in the real world saying about Twiice edible cups. These cups merge the idea of removing the plastic waste from your brew and replacing it with a biscotti cookie cup. So you just eat your mug after your morning coffee or tea.

Myriad of comments on social platforms likes the idea of reducing waste especially if it tastes great and complements the food.

But some concerns include training servers to hold the cup at the bottom rather than the side which people mainly eat.

Probably the biggest concern is cost. Six cups in a starter kit are selling for us$23. Even 23 New Zealand dollars remains a tall task. For any mass adoption, one needs to have a better product than the standard and also at a cheaper price. The price point therefore makes the product niche, and that’s ok.

It’s sold across New Zealand and also on the national airline. That’s very cool for the family start up.

In 2015, four family members joined creative forces to produce the product and scaled to the company. Jamie and Stephen (son and father), along with wives Simone and Theresa, always had a knack for the artistic and creative projects.

“Call us a family business, or simply a bunch of committed foodies who love getting stuck into a new project together,” they state on their website.

Rum coffee and lime

This cocktail creates a distinct blend of muscular and curved flavours that blend well together. It is great for personal philosophising or at gatherings.

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A shot of dark rum with smokey hints of coffee and zesty lime. But notes can be varied to one’s preference. The more aged the rum is the less coffee and lime required.

Preparation

One shot of rum, preferably aged in order to allow for a smooth finish with natural sophisticated notes. The more aged the rum the less coffee and lime is required.

Four beans per shot of rum. The beans require less than two minutes to begin to release tones in the drink. Preferably coffee from Jamaica to match the culture of the rum.

One slice of lime without squeezing. Place the lime within the drink. The lime will add zest but squeezing will add sourness to the mix.

Enjoy on the rocks or straight.

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Cotton candy coffee

Cafe owner in Toronto decided to make coffee exciting again by serving cotton candy as sugar.

It looks like foam but dissolves. Apparently it’s become a thing at this cafe called LightCafe. In one drink option, you get the cup with cotton candy then add coffee in a small jar to the cup and watch the candy vanish. Add milk if that’s your thing.

Dunkin Donuts ice coffee delimina

Dunkin Donuts in a move to reduce its waste footprint will dissuade customers from what it turns double coupling when asking for iced coffee drinks.

Dunkin serves iced coffee in tall plastic cups. But over the years a practice has developed in which customers also request styrofoam cups to insulate the coldness of the drink.

It’s a weird oddity that actually doubles that customers waste and Dunkin actually launched a YouTube campaign to dissuade customers from the practice.

Check out @DunkinBoston’s Tweet: https://twitter.com/DunkinBoston/status/1195456516469465088

Cold drinks account for half Starbucks sales

Starbucks CEO Kevin Johnson said that sales of cold coffee and teas now account for about half of the company’s beverage sales. Younger customers in particular are buying those drinks throughout the day, he said, not just in the morning, he said.

“We are being very focused on the things that we know matter the most,” Mr. Johnson said in an interview.

Starbucks lattes nearly half cheaper in Latin America than Jamaica

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Mavis Bank, Jamaica–An independent study on Starbucks chains found that it costs nearly 50 per cent more to buy a latte in Jamaica than in other major coffee growing nations in the region, Colombia or Guatemala.

It costs US$3.30 in Jamaica but the same latte costs US$2.04 in Colombia and US$2.86 in Guatemala. All produce coffee, so why the disparity.

Colombia, formalised a policy which forced Starbucks to buy its coffee locally. As such all the coffee consumed in Starbucks Colombia comes from various coffee regions in Colombia. Jamaica does not have such a policy and this influences the pricing of coffee, as it imports all its beans. In fact Caribbean Coffee which holds the franchise for Starbucks in the island admitted that even the Jamaica Blue Mountainconsumed in Starbucks locally is reimported. Additionally, within a Starbucks in Jamaica, the cheapest origin branded beans are actually from Guatemala for roughly one-third the cost of Jamaica Blue Mountain. Cost conscious consumers gravitate to the cheaper product.

Finder, a non-aligned comparison platform and information service, curated the index, and ranked Jamaica at 43 among the 76 countries surveyed. It ranked Guatemala at 61 and Colombia as the third cheapest in the world.

A latte is made of one-third espresso and two-thirds milk with light foam on top.

The study itself has two components: a coffee cost comparison and a GDP valuation index. In Jamaica, the index showed that a latte is being sold at 6.01 per cent less than the expected coffee cost based on the country’s GDP per capita. In Colombia it found that the coffee is being sold for one-third more expensive than it should, when matched against its GDP per capita.

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Denmark offered the most expensive location for a latte at US$6.05 versus Turkey the cheapest at US$1.78. Geographically, Europe offered the most expensive cup of coffee, followed by Asia and the Americas.

In Jamaica, as Starbucks cafes get more packed, the locals which traditionally do not drink coffee are being weaned on lattes and caps and flat whites. What of the local farmer. Its not likely to change anything as the demand is for cheap quick coffee rather than the luxury provided from the Blue Mountains.

Consequently, the actual benefit of Starbucks in Jamaica is the subsidised Guatemala coffee and other blends. These imports are likely to affect the coffee trade balance in Jamaica as exports have flattened. But that’s the focus of a different article.

The Starbucks index is an informal way to measure the strength or weakness of local currencies for a common item against other countries. It’s supported by research that excludes variances that affect the cost of a coffee, like prices of raw beans, local labour costs and taxes.

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French press coffee back to earth

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Brewing with a coffee-press, known also as a french press or coffee pot, will offer an earthy brew in contrast to a pour over or percolator. The press will keep the oils and the full body flavor in every cup. The pour-over, led by minimalist styling of a Chemex, on the other hand, will enhance the brightness and fruitiness of the brew as it filters out much of the full body.

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For many, the preferred method of brewing depends on the flavours one wants to enchance. Coffee geeks wants drinkers to consider the ratio of coffee to water. Research advises drinkers that the ideal is a 1-to-14 or 1-to-15 mix. They speak about the type of water, the type of kettle, the weight of the coffee, the time to allow the coffee to seep. Everything except the coffee.

For many however coffee isn’t math but rather art. And while quality products are nice amenities, it is quality coffee that’s the most important. There are many ways to know quality coffee, an easy method involves avoiding bottom-shelf supermarket beans in favour of premium single estate coffee.

Regardless, at the crack of dawn, quality coffee remains the most important ingredient even above the brewing method.

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Deaf Can getting most exposure at Jamaica coffee festival 2019

Deaf Can! the not for profit coffee enterprise that trains deaf students in the art of coffee got the most exposure at the Jamaica Coffee Festival even above global brands Starbucks.Why– for a few reasons.First, patrons were not seeking out Seattle roasted coffee (or re-imported Jamaica coffee). So Starbucks prominent stall was largely empty. Largely ignored.Second, Deaf Can! assisted three companies which led the company to have three cobranded booths at a coffee festival. That resulted in them having arguably the largest floor space. Third , they offered a zany cold brew coffee made from peaberries. It represented one of the most innovative core coffee drinks on display.DeafCan is currently seeking to raise about $7.5 million from the Jamaica Social Stock Exchange to properly finance their coffee farm in Mandeville. Why not check out their business model here .Over 15 Jamaica coffee brands are represnted at the festival. Notable absent brands are Jablum and Wallenford. There was a cobranded Cannonball and Jablum stall but no marketing beyond a small Jablum banner.Love Jamaica Coffee but can’t be at the festival consider these coffees .