Black Rifle Coffee apparently banned in Assault Weapon Prohibition in Canada

Canada‘s Prime Minister, Justin Trudeau, appears to have accidentally banned Black Rifle Coffee in a new order that prohibits 1,500 semi-automatic guns. “Say it ain’t so …

Source: Justin Trudeau May Have Accidentally Banned Black Rifle Coffee In Assault Weapon Prohibition

Why Jablum Gold made with Jamaica peaberry coffee beans are rare

Jablum Gold is made of beans from the Jamaica Blue Mountains. These beans are not only handpicked on the farms, they are also curated in the factories to get the fattest beans and best taste. So no boudbr it’s made in low quantities.

Add peaberries which are made from 1 in every 10 beans on average, then add the duration process and you get an exceedingly rare Jablum Gold peaberries.

This coffee plays its part offering theatre from unpacking the beans, inspecting its pea like nature, smelling, then cupping.

Essentially it makes a great cup for the holidays. The tones are traditional chocolate and spice, but the peaberries give it a crisp tealike fruitiness and smoothness.

https://www.etsy.com/listing/515150216/jamaica-blue-mountain-coffee-8-oz-x-1

Cookie coffee cup

So what are people in the real world saying about Twiice edible cups. These cups merge the idea of removing the plastic waste from your brew and replacing it with a biscotti cookie cup. So you just eat your mug after your morning coffee or tea.

Myriad of comments on social platforms likes the idea of reducing waste especially if it tastes great and complements the food.

But some concerns include training servers to hold the cup at the bottom rather than the side which people mainly eat.

Probably the biggest concern is cost. Six cups in a starter kit are selling for us$23. Even 23 New Zealand dollars remains a tall task. For any mass adoption, one needs to have a better product than the standard and also at a cheaper price. The price point therefore makes the product niche, and that’s ok.

It’s sold across New Zealand and also on the national airline. That’s very cool for the family start up.

In 2015, four family members joined creative forces to produce the product and scaled to the company. Jamie and Stephen (son and father), along with wives Simone and Theresa, always had a knack for the artistic and creative projects.

“Call us a family business, or simply a bunch of committed foodies who love getting stuck into a new project together,” they state on their website.